Vardhan Patankar

Research Scholar, Oceans and Coasts

Picture for website vardhan

Ph.D.

For the past few years,  I have worked (alongside colleagues) on a range of basic and applied studies in marine systems. These include studies on understanding the role of local institutions in governing resource use, socio-ecological resilience, illegal marine trade, interactions between dugongs and sea-grass meadows, amongst others. For my doctoral research I evaluated impact of tsunami on the coral reef communities and marine resource utilisation in the Nicobar archipelago. 

My broad research interests are in understanding animal behaviour, species interactions, socio-ecological resilience, and ecosystem level processes in marine environments. In the future, I plan to continue studying coral reefs, dugongs, dolphins, coconut crabs and socio-ecological systems in marine environment. 

Projects

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Conserving an extinct species

Tracking changes in dugong populations in the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago

Agatti 20rubble

Coping with catastrophe

Documenting patterns and processes of resilience in the Lakshadweep reefs

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Mainstreaming resilience principles

Understanding and managing the buffer capacity of the Andaman and Nicobar reefs

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Traditional management and change

Marine resource management in the Nicobar archipelago

Publications

  • Journal Article
    2016
    For traditional island communities in the Nicobar archipelago, complete no-go areas are the most effective form of marine managementFor traditional island communities, no-go areas are the most effective form of management
    Ocean & Coastal Management 133, 53-63 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2016.09.003
    Download

    PDF, 1.16 MB

    For traditional island communities in the Nicobar archipelago, complete no-go areas are the most effective form of marine management

    The ability of local communities to sustainably manage natural resource harvests in coral reefs ecosystem depends heavily on the strength of traditional institutions. Coastal communities have evolved a suite of restrictive practices to control marine offtake and there is considerable recent evidence of their effec- tiveness in protecting and enhancing resource stocks. However, traditionally imposed restrictions can vary considerably in their complexity and in their functional effectiveness. The indigenous communities of the Nicobar Islands are dependent on marine resources for sustenance, managing them with a range of traditionally imposed restrictions. These include limited entry to certain locations, closed seasons and areas, and restrictions on species, size-classes of fish and fishing methods. We tested the relative effectiveness of protection in areas managed under different traditional control regimes by comparing the abundance and biomass of targeted fish groups in managed and unmanaged areas. Our results indicate that reef sites with the strictest form of restriction e essentially no-go areas e had significantly higher abundance and biomass values of most functional groups of fishes compared with partially protected and control locations. In contrast, targeted food fish stocks did not differ from control locations in partially protected sites managed with even complex forms of traditional management. Ensuring that traditional harvest rules are complied is critical to the success of any management system, and our re- sults suggest that they can be most strictly enforced in traditional no-go areas. Our work highlights the importance of critically evaluating the factors influencing traditional management systems to strengthen their ability to protect these reefs from unsustainable overharvest.

  • Popular Article
    2016
    On the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, humans and crocodiles are locked in a conflict
    Vardhan Patankar, Vrushal Pendharkar
    http://www.firstpost.com/living/on-the-andaman-and-nicobar-islands-humans-and-crocodiles-are-locked-in-a-conflict-3078280.html
    Download

    PDF, 3.07 MB

  • Popular Article
    2016
    “ A Hundred More Years To Go”: A Tribute to Dr. Chhapgar
    http://www.sanctuaryasia.com/magazines/features/10196--a-hundred-more-years-to-go-a-tribute-to-dr-chhapgar.html
  • Popular Article
    2016
    The Bay Island Lizard: My Work Companions
    Sanctuary Asia, January. http://www.sanctuaryasia.com/magazines/features/10184-the-bay-island-lizard-my-work-companions.html
  • Popular Article
    2016
    Attacks in the Andamans
    Vardhan Patankar, Vrushal Pendharkar
    Down to Eath, 16th to 30th November issue
  • Popular Article
    2016
    Is there a future for wetland birds of Sippighat?
    Zoya Tyabji, Vardhan Patankar
    http://www.downtoearth.org.in/blog/is-there-a-future-for-wetland-birds-of-sippighat--54276
  • Popular Article
    2016
    Living with change: local responses to global impacts
    Rohan Arthur, Naveen Namboothri, Vardhan Patankar
    Current Conservation, issue 10.2 http://www.currentconservation.org/?q=issue/10.2
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    PDF, 290 KB

  • Popular Article
    2015
    Jewels of the seabed
    The Hindu in School, October 14
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    PDF, 253 KB

  • Journal Article
    2015
    Synchronous Spawning of the Sea CucumberHolothuria (Lessonothuria) pardalisSelenka, 1867 in the Andaman Archipelago, India
    Journal of Bombay Natural History Society, 112 (2) 10.17087/jbnhs/2015/v112i2/104950

    ..

  • Journal Article
    2015
    Erosion of Traditional Marine Management Systems in the Face of Disturbances in the Nicobar Archipelago
    Human Ecology, DOI 10.1007/s10745-015-9781-x

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